Shin Splints (Stretching)

If you frequently get shin splints, here are some simple stretches to help prevent or relieve them. Once you have checked this video out, you can watch the shin splint strengthening video to help keep them strong and prevent further injuries.

Shin splints occur very often in runners who are training for long distance running. The tibialas muscles become inflamed and irritated. Most of the time it is your anterior tibialis muscle, the one in the front, but occasionally they can be your posterior tibialis muscle, the one in the back. Make sure to go to a doctor to get evaluated because sometimes you can have a stress fracture instead of shin splints.

Start off by sitting in a long sit with your legs straight out in front of you. Point your toes downward as far as you comfortably can. You can add a little pressure to get an extra stretch. For more of a stretch, roll over and flatten your feet in a push up position, and push up on the top of your feet. Then you can try kneeling back onto your feet with your toenails on the floor, and lift up onto your toes as seen in the video.

Now you will see some stretches with a noodle or foam roll. Place the roll on the top of your knee, and roll it down your shin or anterior tibialis. Apply more body pressure to get more of a stretch. Then you can turn over and do the same thing with your calf. Roll down your calf muscle, or gastrocnemius muscle, and apply more body pressure for more of a stretch.


DISCLAIMER: The videos, posts and comments contained on this website are not medical advice. Doctor Jo is a licensed Physical Therapist and Doctor of Physical Therapy; however, she is not YOUR Physical Therapist and can't possibly diagnose you through the Internet. So don’t use this website to avoid going to your own healthcare professional or to replace the advice they have given you. This website is only intended to show and discuss correct physical therapy exercises and information and should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any medical condition. If you are not properly diagnosed, the information on this website won’t help, and it could make things worse. So seriously, check with your healthcare professional before doing any of the techniques discussed herein. If you experience any pain or difficulty while exercising, stop immediately and see your healthcare professional.