Hi, I'm Doctor Jo, a licensed Physical Therapist and Doctor of Physical Therapy. I hope you enjoy my video demos of stretches & exercises for common injuries and syndromes. If you have a question, just ask! Be safe. Have fun. And I hope you feel better soon.

Wrist & Hand Stretches for Gamers

Wrist and hand pain is common in gamers from using gaming controllers and/or hand held gaming devices like the Nintendo Switch or DS. This is the case with my buddy Ray from the YouTube channel Raymond Strazdas. He stopped by to get some wrist and hand stretches for gamers.

When gaming, you can have a lot of tightness in your fingers, thumbs, wrists, elbows and even your shoulders and back. Starting off with some wrist range of motion exercises will help loosen up the area. Wrist flexion and extension, as well as radial deviation and ulnar deviation will help relieve some pain. 

Wrist flexor and extensor stretches are a great way to get rid of wrist and elbow tightness. Since these muscles in tendons are in your hand, wrist, and attach at the elbow, it’s important to stretch the whole arm.

Then stretching the thumbs, fingers into flexion and extension, and the webbing between the fingers really help relieve tension when you have been using them for long periods.

A great way to strengthen the thumbs and fingers is to use a rubber band. It’s easy to find, and really helps strengthen the extensor muscles.

A chin tuck is not only a great stretch for your neck muscles, but it also helps reset the muscles to correct your posture.

A chest stretch will also help correct your posture and open up your chest to relieve tightness through the area. You can do this standing with your hands clasped behind your back, or you can stand in a corner and use the walls to help you stretch.

Related Videos:

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Stretches

De Quervain's Syndrome Stretches

Peroneal Tendonitis Stretches & Exercises

Peroneal tendonitis is the inflammation of a tendon in your outer (lateral) ankle.  The peroneal muscles run down the back of the lower leg, and the tendon runs behind the bump on your outer ankle (lateral malleolus).  When the tendon is irritated, it can cause swelling on the outer ankle and ankle pain when walking or exercising. These stretches and exercises should help.

Since the peroneal muscles runs behind and to the outside of the leg, it’s important to stretch the calf area.  You can do this with your legs out in front of you or standing up.  You can even stretch your Achilles tendon and peroneal tendon on a step.

Strengthening the peroneal tendon and muscles are also important.  Since it helps the ankle go into eversion, you can easily exercise them with a resistive band.

Another great way to exercise the whole ankle area is with standing heel/toe raises as well as a balance series.

Finally, a side step up, because of the side to side movement helps strengthen the whole ankle area.

Related Videos:

Sprained Ankle Treatment

Lateral Sprained Ankle Stretches

Knee & Hip Isometric Exercises

Sponsored Content: This video represents the honest opinions of Doctor Jo. Thank you to Activ5 for providing Doctor Jo with a free Activ5 to use. If you purchase the product from these links/ads, Doctor Jo will receive a commission.

Isometric exercises are used when you are not ready to perform strengthening exercises with full movements because you don't have enough strength yet, or because it hurts too much. Here are some isometric exercises for the lower extremities.

Today I'm using the Activ5 to help me track the exercises. Click here to purchase the Activ5.

Sometimes after an injury or surgery, you might be on precautions, and not be allowed to do certain movements yet. Isometric exercises are a great way to get the muscles working again without the movement.

The first exercises are quad sets. Sit in long sitting with your legs straight out in front of you. If you want, put a rolled towel underneath your knee to give yourself a target. Then squeeze your knee down into the roll towards the ground. Hold it for 3-5 seconds, and do ten of them. If you want to see how hard you are pushing, and track your progress, you can buy equipment that helps with this.

Next is a hamstring set. Bend up your knees in a hooklying position. Push your heel down into the ground and hold it for 3-5 seconds, do this 10 times.

The next two are hip abductor and adductor isometric exercises. First take a belt and wrap it around your thighs just above your knees. Push outwards toward the belt like your legs are opening up like a clamshell. Hold for 3-5 seconds, and repeat 10 times.

Finally, take a ball or pillow folded in half, and put it between your knees. Squeeze into the ball and hold for 3-5 seconds, repeat 10 times.

Related Videos:

Knee Isometric / Knee Setting Exercises

Real-Time Knee Pain Exercises & Stretches

Shoulder Tendonitis Exercises for Pain Relief

Shoulder exercises are great for shoulder tendonitis pain relief. This inflammation to the tendons in your shoulder can be the rotator cuff tendons or even the biceps or triceps tendons. There doesn’t always have to be inflammation with the pain, and this is called rotator cuff tendinopathy.

Shoulder tendonitis treatment can be strengthening with and without weights or resistive bands. The first set of exercises can be classified as an exercise or a stretch. Pendulums are very important in any shoulder injury. You can do these with a weight or without a weight.

Shoulder shrugs and shoulder squeezes can be done without a weight or band, but you can add them in later if they become easy. These help strengthen the upper traps and rhomboid muscles.

Resistive bands are a great way to strengthen the shoulder, but make sure you get the right resistance for you. Shoulder external rotation, shoulder flexion, shoulder extension, shoulder abduction, and shoulder scaption work the whole shoulder to help reset the muscles and keep them strong.

Related Videos:

Shoulder Tendonitis Stretches

Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy Stretches

Shoulder Tendonitis Stretches for Pain Relief

Shoulder stretches are great for shoulder tendonitis which is basically an inflammation to the tendons in your shoulder. This can be the rotator cuff tendons or even the biceps or triceps tendons. There doesn’t always have to be inflammation with the pain, and this is called rotator cuff tendinopathy. Shoulder tendonitis stretches can help ease the pain in the shoulder.

Shoulder tendonitis treatment involves stretching and exercising the shoulder.  The first set of stretches can be classified as an exercise or a stretch.  Pendulums are very important in any shoulder injury. You can do these with a weight or without a weight.

Using a wall to support your arm is a great way to stretch your shoulder.  You can do wall slides into shoulder flexion, scaption, and abduction.  You can also use a corner to stretch your chest or pec muscles.

Another great way to improve shoulder motion is by using a stick or cane to help stretch the shoulder.  By moving it with the “good side” you can get a good overall stretch. You can use this for shoulder flexion, shoulder abduction, and shoulder external rotation.

The last stretch is usually the toughest and hardest to get back.  Shoulder internal rotation is very important to reach behind and up our back.  You can use a belt or strap to help with the stretch.

Related Videos:

Shoulder Tendonitis Exercises

Rotator Cuff Exercises with Resistive Bands

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