Ankle & Foot Pain

Hi, I'm Doctor Jo, a Physical Therapist and Doctor of Physical Therapy. I hope you enjoy my video demos of stretches & exercises for common injuries and syndromes. Be safe. Have fun. And I hope you feel better soon.

Achilles Tendon Stretches & Exercises

Buy the achilles tendon worksheetThe Achilles tendon can get very tight when it is irritated or injured, and it is important to keep it stretched out. Here are three simple stretches to keep the Achilles tendon loose.

The first stretch is called a runner's stretch. You want to lean against a wall or something sturdy.  Place the foot you want to stretch behind you. Make sure to keep your heel down and your toes forward pointing towards the wall. With the other foot in front of you, like you are in a lunge position, bend your knee towards the wall until you feel a stretch through your back leg. Try to keep your back leg as straight as possible. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and do it three times. 

Next, put your toes against the wall with your heel on the ground. The closer you can get your heel to the wall, the stronger the stretch. Keeping your heel down, lean into the wall. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and do it three times.

The last stretch you can do standing on a step or curb. Place the ball of your foot on the edge of the step and relax your heel downwards. Hold for 30 seconds and do it 3 times.

 

Ankle Strengthening Exercises

Buy the Ankle Strengthening WorksheetYour ankles are very important with balance. Many times when your ankles become weak, you get very poor balance, and sometimes even have a hard time walking. This video shows you some exercises to strengthen your ankles.

This is a simple 4-way ankle exercise with a resistive band. Start off my propping your ankle up or hang your foot off the bed or table so your heel doesn't touch the floor. Put the band around the ball of your foot for good resistance. First, push your foot down and up. This is called ankle plantarflexion. Next you want to wrap the band around your other foot. Now you will have resistance pulling out. This is ankle eversion. Next you are going to cross your foot over the foot with the band as seen in the video, and pull your foot inward. This is ankle inversion.

Finally, you can use a table leg or heavy chair as your anchor. Wrap it around and pull the band towards you. Pull your foot up towards your head. This is called ankle dorsiflexion. Start off with 10-15 times. If you get to 20-25 and it is easy, increase the resistive band.

 

Plantar Fasciitis

Buy the Plantar Fasciitis WorksheetPlantar fasciitis is when tissue on the bottom of our feet get irritated and inflamed. This can be very painful, and sometimes people have a difficult time walking with it. Often people will have the worst pain in the morning when they first walk. The pain can be in the bottom of the foot, the arch of the foot, and/or the heel.

There are several stretches in this video to help relieve the pain. First you are going to stretch your calf muscle, or gastrocnemius muscle. Keep your leg straight, and take the belt or leash and place it on the ball of your foot. Relax your leg and then pull your foot towards you. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, 3 times. Next, you want to massage the tissue, or fascia on the bottom of your foot. Use circular and spreading motions, and apply more pressure where you feel knots. 

These next stretches you can do sitting. The best time is right before you get out of bed because many people have the most pain when they first put weight on their feet in the morning. You can use a noodle or foam roll, and place it under your foot. Roll lightly at first, and then apply more pressure if it is not too painful. You can also take a water bottle and freeze it. This will give you an ice massage while you are stretching the fascia when rolling it under your foot. 

The last stretch you can do standing on a step or curb. Place the ball of your foot on the edge of the step and relax your heel downwards. This will stretch your fascia and your calf. Hold for 30 seconds and do it 3 times.

 

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