Back Pain

Hi, I'm Doctor Jo, a Physical Therapist and Doctor of Physical Therapy. I hope you enjoy my video demos of stretches & exercises for common injuries and syndromes. Be safe. Have fun. And I hope you feel better soon.

10 Best Scoliosis Exercises

These scoliosis exercises are for postural scoliosis that can come from bad posture or a leg length difference. If you've had scoliosis since you were young, these stretches may not help.

Scoliosis is a curvature of the spine. It can happen when you are young, or it can happen when you are older and have bad posture or a leg length difference. This can cause the muscles on one side of the back to be tight and/or the muscles on the opposite side to be too weak. These exercises are for postural scoliosis.

Starting off on the floor, you will work your core and pelvic muscles. If you can’t get on the floor, you can do them on a couch or bed.

You can also use a Swiss ball (therapy or stability ball) to help work on your balance muscles as well as your back muscles. If you don’t have a ball, you can do these lying down on your stomach. You also want to work on your side as well to strengthen your oblique muscles. Make sure to modify the exercises as you need to.

In standing, you can use weights and resistive bands. Make sure you start of with light resistance for both and slowly progress to something harder. The last exercises are squats with movements. Make sure you are using good form so you don’t irritate something else like your knees.

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Scoliosis Exercises (Postural)

10 Best Scoliosis Stretches

10 Best Scoliosis Stretches

These scoliosis stretches are for postural scoliosis that can come from bad posture or a leg length difference. If you've had scoliosis since you were young, these stretches may not help.

Scoliosis is a curvature of the spine. It can happen when you are young, or it can happen when you are older and have bad posture or a leg length difference. This can cause the muscles on one side of the back to be tight and/or the muscles on the opposite side to be too weak. These stretches are for postural scoliosis.

Start off sitting in a chair. You can stretch just the side that is tight, or you can stretch both sides. Stretching the quadratus lumborum (QL) helps relax the muscles on the side of the spine.

You can also do an active stretch, which is moving your whole trunk and arms while rotating. This is also a great way to stretch the trunk muscles. Roll downs help get the muscles close to the spine stretched out.

The next stretches are on the floor. If you can’t get on the floor, you can do them on your couch or bed. Stretches like the cat/dog, way the tail, prayer, and side to side prayer stretch will help loosen up the muscles in the back and around the spine.

Some of the final stretches are a little more intense, so make sure you are ready to stretch that much before trying them.

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Scoliosis Exercises (Postural)

10 Best Scoliosis Exercises

Top 5 Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Exercises & Stretches

Buy Lumbar Spinal Stenosis WorksheetLumbar spinal stenosis can press on the spinal cord and the nerves that travel through the spine. Symptoms include pain or cramping in the legs when standing for long periods or when walking.

Lumbar spinal stenosis often happens with age. The discomfort usually eases when bending forward or sitting down. These exercises & stretches should help relieve lumbar spinal stenosis pain.

Start off by stretching your lower back and gluteus muscles. This will help take the pressure off your spine.

Then you will go into a progress of the dead bug. This includes a pelvic tilt, and movement of the arms and legs. Make sure you master the pelvic tilt first because it’s the most important part of the exercise.

Finally, you will do a bird dog progression in quadruped. This helps strengthen the core, and it helps work on general stability.

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10 Best Lower Back Exercises to Relieve Low Back Pain

Relieve Lower Back Pain with This Real Time Seated Knee to Chest Stretch

5 General Back Pain Relief Treatments

Buy General Back Pain WorksheetSponsored Content: This video contains paid product placement. Thank you to Vital Spark for sponsoring this video and providing Doctor Jo with a free Cordus to use.

Click here to purchase the Cordus featured in the video!

General back pain can literally stop you in your tracks. It can affect the way you walk, movement, and even prevent you from getting a good night’s sleep. These 5 back pain treatments may help.

The first back pain treatment is a pelvic tilt. Pelvic tilts are a great easy and gentle way to get your core and pelvis muscles moving and activating. When done correctly, it can help relax your back.

Next is a bridge. Bridges help strengthen the glutes, hamstrings, and trunk area which can help relieve general back pain. Make sure you are doing slow and controlled movements to get the best results.

Another treatment is to relax the deep spinal muscles. This can be done with pressure or trigger point releasing. There are many ways you can do this. One great way is using the Cordus. It helps put pressure on the deep spinal muscles while leaving a space so you aren’t getting a lot of pressure on your spinous process.

Then there is a trunk rotation. This will help get the muscles on the sides of your back stretched out and relaxed.

Finally is a knee to chest. This helps open up the spaces in the lumbar spine, and can give you back pain relief pretty quickly.

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5 Best Back Pain Relief Treatments

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