Hip & Pelvis Pain

Hi, I'm Doctor Jo, a Physical Therapist and Doctor of Physical Therapy. I hope you enjoy my video demos of stretches & exercises for common injuries and syndromes. Be safe. Have fun. And I hope you feel better soon.

7 Tight Hip Stretches

Buy Hip Stretches WorksheetTight hips can be caused by many different things including arthritis, muscles imbalance, strains, sprains, and alignment issues. These hip stretches should help.

You basically want to stretch out all the muscles around your hip to help relax the hip muscles. A knee to chest stretch stretches the low back and posterior hip muscles, a butterfly stretch stretches the groin and adductor muscles, a piriformis stretch stretches the piriformis and glutes, and a hip flexor stretch stretches all the hip flexor and anterior hip muscles.

Standing up, you can work the hip muscles swinging movements to help relax and decrease the tightness. Hip circles, hip abduction/adduction, and hip flexion/extension swings do a great job of working the hip muscles and relaxing them as well.

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IT Band Syndrome Stretches & Exercises

Buy IT Band WorksheetWith IT Band Syndrome, many like to debate whether it’s really the IT band that's the cause or if it’s your tensor fasciae latae (TFL). The TFL is really the muscle belly of the IT band, so stretching and exercising one should help the other.

There are many ways to stretch the IT band/TFL. You can stretch it lying down with a strap, standing up, and a few other ways.

It’s also good to stretch your hamstrings and your quad muscles because they are closely related to the IT band, and often are tight and irritated as well.

Exercises like clamshells and hip abduction in sidelying and standing do a great job of strengthening the gluteus medius as well as the TFL and hip area. You can always use a resistive band or weights to make the exercises more challenging.

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7 Best Pelvic Stabilization Exercises (Advanced)

Pelvic stabilization exercises are a great way to help strengthen the hips, pelvis, and general core area. These should also help for things like SI joint dysfunction, leg length discrepancies, and other pelvic issues.

If you’ve already mastered the beginner pelvic stabilization exercises and moderate pelvic stabilization exercises, these are a great next step. Some of exercises are similar, but adding another component to make it a little harder.

The first three are going to be an advanced clamshell with a bigger range of motion, a side plank leg lift also with a bigger range, and a side plank with a hip drop. These are great for your gluteus medius muscles and core muscles, as well as your hip rotators.

The next few exercises use a Swiss ball or therapy/stability ball and a stability disc. The ball adds a balance component which makes the smaller muscles work much harder as well as your core and glutes.

Finally there is the single leg squat. This time, try to put your other foot out in front of you instead of behind you. This will help keep your pelvis and hips in alignment while doing the exercise.

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How to Use an SI Belt or Maternity Belt

SI belts and maternity belts help support the SI (sacroiliac) Joint. They can help relieve pain, help keep you in alignment, and help keep you pain free while strengthening the muscles around the SI joint.

SI Belts can also be helpful if you are pregnant. In that case, they are usually referred to as Maternity Belts or Maternity Belly Bands.

You can wear an SI Belt or Maternity Belt over or under your clothes. Find the top of your pelvic or hip bones (iliac crest), and the pubic bone. You want the belt to be somewhere in between the two. It slow needs to be where the sacrum is at the back to help support that SI joint. Make sure it’s snug, but not too tight.

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