Wrist & Arm Pain

7 Best Golfer's Elbow Pain Treatments (Medial Epicondylitis)

Sponsored Content: This video contains paid product placement. Thank you to Simien for sponsoring this video and providing Doctor Jo with a free Golfer's Elbow Brace and Armbar to use. If you purchase the products from these links/ads, Doctor Jo will receive a commission.

Click here to purchase a Golfer's Elbow Brace, or click here to purchase an Armbar.

Golfer’s elbow, or medial epicondylitis, is an inflammation on the inside of the elbow. It often comes from an overuse injury. This video shows you my top seven treatments for golfer’s elbow.

The first treatment is wrist flexion and extension active range of motion (AROM). This will help loosen up the muscles and get them warm to stretch.

Then you will go into a wrist flexor stretch. You can do this modified or with a full stretch. The wrist flexors go from the wrist and fingers all the way to the medial elbow.

Next, using a golfer’s elbow support brace is a great way to take pressure off the epicondyle by putting pressure on the muscle belly.

Now you want to strengthen the muscles. You can do this with a light weight like a soup or vegetable can. Make sure your movements are slow and controlled for wrist flexion and extension.

With an Armbar, you can do all kinds of exercises. This one is an eccentric wrist extension movement. 

You can also do stability exercises with the Armbar as well. For these, try to keep your arm and elbow still, and move just at your wrist. It’s sometimes hard to get, but it really works those muscles well.

The last treatment is soft tissue mobilization (STM). This is not a massage, even though that can be helpful. You want to move the tissue around to help break up scar tissue and adhesions.

Related Videos

Golfer's Elbow Stretches & Exercises

Elbow Pain

7 Best Tennis Elbow Pain Treatments (Lateral Epicondylitis)

Sponsored Content: This video contains paid product placement. Thank you to Simien for sponsoring this video and providing Doctor Jo with a free Tennis Elbow Brace and Armbar to use. If you purchase the products from these links/ads, Doctor Jo will receive a commission.

Click here to purchase a Tennis Elbow Brace, or click here to purchase an Armbar.

Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, is an inflammation on the outside of the elbow. It often comes from an overuse injury. This video will show you my top seven treatments for tennis elbow.

The first treatment is wrist flexion and extension active range of motion (AROM). This will help loosen up the muscles and get them warm to stretch.

Then you will go into a wrist extensor stretch. You can do this modified or with a full stretch. The wrist extensors go from the wrist all the way to the lateral elbow.

Next, using a tennis elbow support brace is a great way to take pressure off the epicondyle by putting pressure on the muscle belly.

Now you want to strengthen the muscles. You can do this with a light weight like a soup or vegetable can. Make sure your movements are slow and controlled for wrist flexion and extension.

With an Armbar, you can do all kinds of exercises. This one is an eccentric wrist extension movement.

You can also do stability exercises with the Armbar as well. For these, try to keep your arm and elbow still, and move just at your wrist. It’s sometimes hard to get, but it really works those muscles well.

The last treatment is soft tissue mobilization (STM). This is not a massage, even though that can be helpful. You want to move the tissue around to help break up scar tissue and adhesions.

Related Videos:

Tennis Elbow Stretches & Exercises

Elbow Pain Relief

5 Ways to Relieve Wrist Pain

Sponsored Content: This video represents the honest opinions of Doctor Jo. Thank you to Thermotex for sponsoring this video and providing Doctor Jo with a free Thermotex Platinum and Wrist Unit to use/review. If you purchase the product using the links/ads below, Doctor Jo will receive a commission.

Click here to purchase Thermotex Platinum.

Click here to purchase the Thermotex Wrist Unit.

If you have a wrist injury or ailment including arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, sprains and strains, ligament injuries, and overuse injuries, then this video will show you 5 ways to help relieve this pain including using far infrared heat.

Here are my top five ways to relieve wrist pain.

The first stretch is for your wrist flexors and extensors. Start off with your arm straight out in front of you. Bring your wrists upward to stretch your wrist flexors. If you need more of a stretch, push up with the other hand. Now bring your wrists downward or into flexion to stretch the wrist extensors. Hold each stretch for 30 seconds and do them three times each.

The second way to relieve pain is to use Far Infrared Heat. Far infrared heats the area with light vs. actual heat, so it can penetrate deeper into the area. A traditional heating pad usually only heats about 0.25 cm, but far infrared can go up to 6 cm, or 2.36 inches. It helps increase the circulation to the area to provide temporary relief.

The Thermotex Platinum and Wrist Unit are both great devices that use this Far Infrared heat therapy to help relieve pain.

Click here to watch my full review for the Thermotex Platinum, which also features more detailed info about far infrared heat.

Next you will do wrist flexion and extension. You can place your arm on a table or counter top, you can hold your elbow in your other hand, or you can hold your arm in the air. Make a fist with your palm downward. At your wrist, bend your fist downward into flexion. Hold it for just a few seconds and then bend it up into extension. Do this about 10 times each way.

Then you will do wrist pronation and supination. Bend your elbow to 90 degrees, and keep it by your side so you are getting the movement only at your wrist and elbow. Turn your wrist palm up for supination and palm down for pronation. If you need a little overpressure, you can use a hammer. The heavy end will help your wrist rotate further.

Finally, you will do radial deviation and ulnar deviation. Make a fist with your hand, and turn your wrist so your thumb is facing up. Bend your wrist up and down. Try 10 each way, and then work your way up as you get stronger.

Related Videos:

Using Far Infrared Heat for Pain Relief

5 Ways to Relieve Peripheral Neuropathy Foot Pain & Other Foot Ailments

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome, aka Ulnar Nerve Entrapment

Cubital tunnel syndrome, also known as ulnar nerve entrapment, is when the ulnar nerve becomes compressed or irritated at the elbow. These stretches and exercises are a great treatment for cubital tunnel syndrome.

An ulnar nerve glide helps loosen up the nerve when it is compressed. These should only be one 10 times once a day because any more might irritate the nerve even more.

With your thumb facing up toward the ceiling, flexing and extending at the elbow also helps free up the ulnar nerve in the cubital tunnel.

You can also help glide the tendons of the muscles around the elbow, which are also at the wrist by opening and closing your hand. You can do this with your elbow flexed or extended.

Then you can do soft tissue mobilizations at the elbow to help break up scar tissue. Be very gentle with this so you don’t risk irritating the nerve even more.

It’s also important to stretch your wrist flexors and extensors which attach at the elbow.

Finally a combination move of flexing the elbow and extending the wrist, and then straightening the elbow and flexing the wrist helps open up the cubital tunnel.

Related Videos:

Nerve Glides for Unlar, Median, and Radial Nerves

Elbow Pain Stretches & Exercises

Wrist & Hand Stretches for Gamers

Wrist and hand pain is common in gamers from using gaming controllers and/or hand held gaming devices like the Nintendo Switch or DS. This is the case with my buddy Ray from the YouTube channel Raymond Strazdas. He stopped by to get some wrist and hand stretches for gamers.

When gaming, you can have a lot of tightness in your fingers, thumbs, wrists, elbows and even your shoulders and back. Starting off with some wrist range of motion exercises will help loosen up the area. Wrist flexion and extension, as well as radial deviation and ulnar deviation will help relieve some pain. 

Wrist flexor and extensor stretches are a great way to get rid of wrist and elbow tightness. Since these muscles in tendons are in your hand, wrist, and attach at the elbow, it’s important to stretch the whole arm.

Then stretching the thumbs, fingers into flexion and extension, and the webbing between the fingers really help relieve tension when you have been using them for long periods.

A great way to strengthen the thumbs and fingers is to use a rubber band. It’s easy to find, and really helps strengthen the extensor muscles.

A chin tuck is not only a great stretch for your neck muscles, but it also helps reset the muscles to correct your posture.

A chest stretch will also help correct your posture and open up your chest to relieve tightness through the area. You can do this standing with your hands clasped behind your back, or you can stand in a corner and use the walls to help you stretch.

Related Videos:

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Stretches

De Quervain's Syndrome Stretches

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